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An Independent Waldorf High School For Grades 9-12
 
Alumni

Alumni Spotlight, David Shulman ‘04

WHS is honored to feature David Shulman, M.D. ‘04 in our Alumni Spotlight! David’s love of science, learning, and helping others has led him to where he is today – a successful medical doctor. When reflecting on his Waldorf High School education, David remembers “being a part of a thoughtful and caring community I was excited to spend time with and learn from each day. WHS provided a well-rounded education as a whole and within each class.” When asked about his preparedness for higher education, David answered with: “the skill-set I developed while producing main lesson books well prepared me for producing study booklets in college and medical  school. I will never forget the rigor of Ms. Delaney’s history classes, which had a similar framework to my college courses”. When David began his undergraduate education, he recalls being very nervous to attend classes with students who experienced a more conventional high school education that included Advanced Placement courses. David remarked that “I did just fine if not better than most of these students”. Click here to read more.
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Alumni Spotlight: Anne Dudley Marling ‘01

Waldorf High School is honored to feature Anne Dudley Marling in our May Alumni Spotlight! Anne, a member of WHS’ Class of 2001, is an accomplished scholar, world traveler, and loving wife. When reflecting on her Waldorf education, Anne greatly values the school’s Main Lesson course format – she compared Main Lessons to “mini college courses” as they well prepared her for the rigor of college. 
 
Anne also appreciates WHS’ emphasis on critical thinking skill development, a skill that she has applied throughout her academic and professional careers as well as personal life.She has fond memories of high school, including her class trips, playing soccer, the wide variety of elective courses offered, and an art infused curriculum. Click here to read more.

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Alumni Spotlight: Chris Bednar ‘00

Waldorf High School is honored to feature Christian “Chris” Bednar ’00 in our February Alumni Spotlight!  Chris, a member of Waldorf High School’s first graduating class, hit the ground running after WHS.  He earned three degrees; became Co-Director of a private tutoring company, Boston Scholastics; teaches developmental English at North Shore Community College, and is a loving husband and father of three children. READ FULL ARTICLE...
 
 

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Alumni Spotlight, Adam Curtis ‘01

Waldorf High School is honored to feature Adam Curtis ’01 as our October Alumni Spotlight!  Prior to attending Waldorf High School, Adam graduated from the Waldorf elementary school, Waldorf School of Lexington, in 1997. Throughout his years both at the Waldorf School of Lexington and Waldorf High School, Adam was able to express himself through his artwork and woodworking as well as form lifelong friendships.
 
 
Upon graduation from WHS, Adam was accepted into the Furniture Design Program at Rhode Island School of Design where Adam’s artistic abilities and his craft were further developed. Upon graduation from RISD, Adam was featured in art shows at Cary Memorial Library in Lexington, MA and most recently was hired as a woodworker for the renowned company, Thomas Moser Furniture.  Thomas Moser has been crafting unique award winning wood furniture pieces for more than 40 years.  
 
 
Adam lives in Auburn, Maine with his wife Laura Bliss, WHS class of 2002 alumnus. When Adam is not working at Thomas Moser, he enjoys outdoor activities with his dog, Rocco, and rooting for his favorite Boston sports teams. 
 

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WHS Alum, Trevor Ruggiero, Challenges Graduates

Don't Be Afraid to Be Different!
 
This year's Commencement speaker, Trevor Ruggiero '04, Waldorf High School alumnus, has a lot in common with the graduates from the Class of 2015. As someone who sat where they sat just over a decade ago, he spoke to them about their future. He let them know some of the conversations they may have with future college classmates and the "silence and blank stares" they will be met with when they reveal that they graduated from a class of just 18 people. Or the conversation that may come up over the philosophical question of, "Can art ever really be practical?"

Trevor told of the answer he would often give to the question, "What else (besides sports) did you guys do at your school?" "Well. . .we did plays, we performed Shakespeare, we put on concerts, we learned our history through art, we learned about the Native Americans, Transcendentalists, and Parzival. We took projective geometry, geochemistry, and zoology. We went on canoe trips; we biked around Nantucket reading Moby Dick. We went to Hermit Island and dug for clams; we did internships, and some of us went and lived in another country for four months." He said, "After having this same conversation several times, you will begin to realize that your high school experience was a little different from that of your new friends."

Trevor ​told the graduates that, though it was different, he found many advantages in having a Waldorf education. After graduating from college with an engineering degree, he found that he would have to make presentations to the public. "At no point in my college career had they prepared us for the day when we would have to present our work in a public forum. Another engineer might have faltered, might have gotten stage fright. . . but not I because . . . in our WHS tenth grade Greek play, I got on stage in front of my family and friends and I kissed Sarah Basmajian wearing nothing but an old bed sheet modeled into a makeshift toga."

"I say that you have a leg up because the diploma that you receive today represents four years of truly unique experiences and friendships. The best way to prepare for life is to have as many different experiences as you can.

"There are no exams or AP classes that you can study for to learn all that you need to know, nor is there a universal metric for gauging success.

"Much like Waldorf, life works on a pass/fail system. There will be bad days: you will fail. There will be good days: you will succeed and pass. And then there will be really good days, and on those days, don’t forget to give yourself a pass with recognition. The important thing is to be honest and kind with yourself. Recognize when you have failed, make some adjustment, forgive your failures, and move on.

"Here at Waldorf you have learned the value of difference whether it be the broad and varied subjects you have studied, or the diverse and valuable friendships you have that might not have been made were you not in a class of only 18 students. At a time when there is conflict and war abroad due to intolerance of others' religions or nationalities, police brutality here at home against those of a different skin color, and an ineffective government because of an unwillingness to compromise and reason with the other party, we need people who do not shy away from differences, who are not afraid to be themselves and stand out in a crowd, and who accept others even though they may be different from themselves.

"So when you leave here today, even though it goes against our human nature, don’t be afraid to be different."

Trevor graduated from Northeastern University​ earning a B.S. in mechanical engineering with a minor in electrical engineering. After graduating, he was accepted in and completed the Gordon Engineering Leadership Program at Northeastern​ with a masters degree in electrical engineering. He works as a Design Engineer at Fikst Product Development. In 2010, Trevor taught an elective class at Waldorf High School in CAD (Computer-Aided Design) and, at that time, gave our technology program a boost with his donation of computers and monitors.

Winner of Fulbright Award to Teach English and Jazz to High School Students in Berlin, Germany

Soren Gabrielson '2003
IMG_4492.JPGSoren Gabrielsen, a member of Waldorf High School of Massachusetts Bay's graduating class of 2003 and graduate of Connecticut College (2007), has recently been selected to receive the prestigious Fulbright Teaching Fellowship. Soren, who pursued a double major in German and philosophy in college, will teach English in a German high school in Berlin, and he plans to start an extracurricular club for students to study American jazz and folk music. Established by the U.S. government after World War II, the Fulbright program provides for international exchanges with the aim of furthering intellectual and cultural relationships between the U.S. and other countries. Each year, approximately 1,150 students are awarded Fulbright grants. Fulbright fellows receive round-trip transportation to the host country, a living stipend, research allowances and medical insurance.

While a student at Waldorf High School, Soren studied German and spent a semester studying abroad at a German Waldorf high school as part of Waldorf's exchange program. "Living and studying in Germany, of course, really accelerated my learning of the language," he says. "The experience was so fantastic that I decided to major in German in college and do another year of study in Germany." Soren spent his junior year abroad at the University of Freiburg where he took a full slate of seminar classes designed for native German speakers, not the lecture classes the typical American students take. "I didn't realize until much later that my choice of classes was unusual and maybe not the smartest thing to do. The workload was huge," he says.

Soren credits one of his experiences at Waldorf High School with giving him the idea for his Fulbright proposal. "I had been playing violin and viola for several years in youth orchestras at a fairly high level, but I was getting burned out with all the practicing. Then Willie Sordullo, the jazz teacher, asked me to play viola with the jazz ensemble. Jazz and the challenge of improvisation turned everything around for me and re-energized my interest in music. I played jazz on my viola for hours. I was so excited because I had found the freedom to create my own music. That experience made me think that studying jazz and folk music would be an exciting way for German students to learn about American culture and study English. I will be designing a curriculum that will explore the music's history and development through listening to recordings, reading contemporaneous news articles, and watching live concert films and documentaries. I also hope to show how jazz and folk music have influenced other genres of music, art and literature," he says.

To Soren's former teachers at Waldorf High School, it's no surprise that this student of German and philosophy is going off to Berlin to teach jazz and folk music. One of the hallmarks of his high school years was his enthusiasm for the breadth of the Waldorf high school program. "What I appreciate most about my Waldorf education is that I never felt that I had to fit into someone else's mold or limit myself to one or two things," he says. "At Waldorf, I experienced an environment where I felt comfortable to develop many different interests, like sports, music, German, art, drama, as well as academics. I felt free to work hard and challenge myself to do well, not just in one area but in several."

As he looks forward to his Fulbright fellowship, which will start in September, Soren anticipates that it will help him figure out what his next steps are: "I'm considering graduate school and the possibility of teaching at the university level, or I might decide to go to law school. I know I'm going to learn a lot in Berlin. Not only am I going to learn more German, but I'm going to know a lot more about jazz and folk music by the end. I'm excited about all of it."

Standing Out Without Standing Alone

"Standing Out Without Standing Alone, by Douglas Gerwin and David Mitchell. This article summarizes the Research Institute for Waldorf Education's survey of Waldorf high school graduates.
  • 94% attend college
  • 47% major in the arts or humanities; 42% in the sciences
  • 89% are highly satisfied in their choice of occupation
  • 82% place ethical principles as their highest priority in the workplace
Standing Out Without Standing Alone

The strengths of Waldorf High School are many. One is the acceptance of all students and the welcoming, nonjudgmental atmosphere. Another is capturing the interest of students; it is real experiential learning.
Waldorf High School Parent
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